Alligator Alley | Hurricane Season at the Swamp
Alligator Alley is a swamp sanctuary with an elevated boardwalk where you can get an up close view hundreds of alligators & wildlife in their natural habitat.
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Hurricane Season at the Swamp

While Alligator Alley is home to over 450 alligators, it is also crawling with scaly friends of all kinds. From snakes and turtles to tortoises and frogs, we have countless reptiles to interact with at the farm. Here is all you need to know about reptiles at Alligator Alley:

Hurricane season is upon us at the swamp. From June until the end of November, the Gulf Coast is prone to frequent tropical storms of various sizes. At Alligator Alley we take extra precautions like securing trash cans and other equipment when storms roll in to ensure that our reptile friends are well protected. 

Although we are located inland enough to avoid severe flooding, we still like to plan ahead. Fortunately, our swamp is surrounded by a double-fenced boundary – one of these fences reaches four feet in the ground and 10 feet tall. Our spillway allows us to adjust the water level when it floods so that our alligators remain safe during storms and avoid being flooded out of the swamp. The last thing we want is for our alligators to be swept away from such an oasis. Oh, and don’t worry, we always make sure our alligators have full bellies before a storm!

Alligators predict impending storms just as well, if not better than humans do. They can instinctively sense when a storm is coming due to a drop in barometric pressure. When they sense low pressure, they will bury themselves deep into the swamp and remain safe until the storm passes.

Our other animals like snakes, lizards, turtles and tortoises require a little more preparation than alligators before a storm. We like to give them extra food and board up their glass cages with plywood to prevent the glass from breaking. 

Be cautious during and especially after storms as displaced alligators in the wild tend to take shelter under porches and decks. Make sure to check your backyard and neighborhoods for any alligators that may have been relocated due to flooding. If you do come across an alligator, please contact Alabama Ecological Services for help. It’s never a good idea to approach one of these guys in the wild. 

A hurricane may temporarily put a dampener on summer plans but, at Alligator Alley, it won’t keep our alligators from having a good time. View our hours and pricing to plan your next visit to Alligator Alley accordingly. We can’t wait for you to visit!

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